Schools Are Still Not Getting The Point.

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Our daughter came home last night and told us about a female student who was clearly showing signs of distress. My husband and I both informed her that she needed to talk to her school counselor about the student in question. After we picked her up today from school, we asked her if she talked to the counselor and her reply with unfortunate.

“Mom, I really don’ t think they care. When I talked to the counselor, she didn’t really seem to want to hear it.”

We both stated that she had done her job and now it was time for the school to do their job and follow up with the report. Right now children are looking and they are paying attention, more than ever. If you work in a school and see problematic behavior, you must act. If you think your role isn’t important, think again. You are a lifeline, a lifeguard and even the it factor in some of the children’s lives.

About four year ago, I got the chance to go to a conference and see Kevin Hines as one of the main speakers. It was an eye opening experience in how we should all be dealing with people who show signs of distress. You don’t wait, you check it out.

A Conversation About Being Happy With My 13 Yr Old

I’ve come to the conclusion that our children feel like that must be happy 100 percent of the time. Recently, my daughter told me she felt unhappy and that she couldn’t put her finger on the reason. I explained that it’s normal to be unhappy at times and that it would be quite abnormal to be happy all the time. She looked at me as if I had said something Greek.

I went on to explain that we all feel unhappy at times, but it’s what we do with those feelings that predict the outcome of that day. I told her about the family I had to question with their dying child in the room. Happiness will be hard to find for a long time due to the loss of their child. She looked and said yeah you’re right. She revealed that she was unhappy because she felt like none of the guys she liked ever liked her back.

After watching the sorrow in her eyes, I insisted that she take out a list and write everyone’s name down for future reference. She looked at me and smiled. I then informed her it was the Brown curse to be a little different in middle school but to turn into a beautiful butterfly in high school, revealing that it happened to me and both of her sisters. In that moment my daughter was happy not for some nice object that I presented her with, but that I took the time to help her find a solution to her problem.

Listen to your children!

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