Learning How To Stay Calm In Scary Situations

I was looking at YouTube and I came across this video of a college student working outside of his dorm. He was collecting trash as part of a work study when a cop came up to him and started questioning him about his reasons for being there. The young man then pulls out the only ID he has which happens to be a student ID.

The cops questioned him about having identification with his address on it. As many of you know, school IDs do not have addresses on them, and depending on the student they might not have driver’s licenses. Well, as the student tries to explain that he doesn’t have anything else, the cops starts asking him about his birthday and all hell starts to break out.

This is the reason so many black children are killed in the line of fire. The student was rightfully upset, but he didn’t understand that he was risking his life by walking around not following directions. In my opinion, this cop tries to insinuate that this kid is becoming a threat to him. He was saying trigger words like threat, weapon and things such as that which would have warranted the use of a gun.

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After the video continues a man walks outside the building and confirms the identity of the student which prompts the policemen to ask the man to talk to the student due to the student being upset over the encounter. This situation was in bad need for conflict management from the start. It’s time for policemen to start taking the deescalation training seriously. I recall going to a conference once with two young officers sitting behind us and they laughed and goofed around nearly half of the training. If we want things to get better on the outside, we need to make sure we are teaching better on the inside.

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Summer School My Way

My children can’t go to summer school, so I will bring it to them this year. It appears that both of my children have inherited my husband’s disdain for history. I happen to love history, life science, social science, and even managed to take extra classes in those areas in college. So, it is safe to say we will start today with a lesson on how it all started.

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This morning we will start off talking about Pangaea, Continental Drift theory, Southern/Northern Hemisphere and how we all started. If you are wondering how and why we decided that our children needed this lesson, it is because one of our lovely children thought California was in Texas. It really was a wtf moment. We have helped with history homework in the past, but for some reason that lack of knowledge never came to surface.

After we made it to the store, my husband politely asked me if I would teach our children this summer exclusively over the subjects they seem to be low in, and of course, I was delighted. This morning I will work on my lesson plan, and try to help the girls better understand the world as we know it. I knew those classes would matter one day!

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I have science and history covered. However, I need help with drama. Both girls are in theater and both are on the fence about their drama classes. I would like to do something for them to help them gain more confidence in reading plays and memorizing them. Does anyone know of a good method for studying drama?

How My Children View Black History Month

I try to be as encouraging as I can when it comes to things I talk to my children about. This is Black History Month so I thought it would be a good idea to watch some black historical shows with the girls. I found this one series on HULU called “The Book Of Negroes” I thought it sounded like a good show. After minutes went by, the girls started to get up and walk out of the room. I looked around and noticed they had an uncomfortable twitch going, so, I paused the movie.

That’s when it happened. I was bombarded with questions as to why was I watching this type of show? It’s Black History Month so I thought it would be a good idea to talk about our roots, but I should have known better. Every Black History Month we run into this same issue. I find a good movie or show to view and the children protest. So this time around they asked me something that I haven’t heard before. They insisted that watching the show made them feel sad and then they asked me, why didn’t it make me sad? I told them that it reminded me that we are here for a reason and that our people made big sacrifices so that we would be able to live in the house we live in, eat the foods we eat, walk down the streets we walk down, and sleep in late on Saturdays, if we wanted to.

They countered with, doesn’t it make you dislike white people? I answered no more than I would dislike the ones who sold our ancestors into slavery. They nodded and continued out of the room. I don’t know if they will ever be ready to learn about our history, but I don’t think I’ll ever stop trying to give little history lessons when I can. However, I can’t lie, there’s part of me starting to wonder if we maybe focus a little too much on the history and not enough on the future.

Can Mass Migration Destabilize A Country?

This morning we are going to look at how destabilization throws a country into economic hardship for centuries. Most civilizations are started with basic needs which are normally the resources that help to make up the foundation for supporting the occupants around the area. These needs include food, governing body, workforce, and in most cases religion. We’ve seen throughout history how the absence of one can soon throw another area into the turmoil. It’s like a car, you can’t drive it without the alternator.

Let’s take Africa for example, during slavery a vast number of young men and women were sold into slavery. The results of slavery created a large gap in potential workers, protectors, and skills for the continent. In the years that followed slavery, Africa would soon be thrown into numerous tribal wars, racist governments, genocides and famines crippling entire populations. One could say the absence of so many people set the country up for a near imminent downfall. It opened to door for crime.

The situation in Honduras reminds me of the African trade in many ways. People are no longer bringing people over on boats, but someone is helping to move these people from their country to America. The sad truth of it all, is that they are doing to their country, what was done to Africa many many years ago. By migrating to the United States or even Mexico they are helping to set their country up for a devastating blow that will be felt for generations to come.

If there’s crime in those areas, it is because the very people who were able to defend it, went away. Slave traders didn’t pull up on the shores and take them from their families, they went willingly. Many of us have our different reasons for feeling the way we feel about immigration, but I think it helps to chip away at the very essence of a country. I’ve always felt a ping of sadness when it comes to not knowing anything about my ancestors. I’m a little jealous when people mention that they were able to go visit areas that were once owned by their ancestors. To think of someone willingly giving up who they are, reminds me of what many of us African Americans, never had. We never had a choice. So here we are today. I’m proud to be American, but I also know what my ancestors gave up. I know their struggle was real and given a choice, they would have made their way back to Africa.

So, when you think about immigration, think about the country and remember the lesson of Africa. What takes the place and how does that entity set the course for the nation? Are we helping to destabilize an area for selfish reasons, such as the quest for cheap labor?