Remembering September 11th 2001.

I don’t normally do blog postings from my phone, but I wanted to share something with you. On September, 11th, 2001 my husband had just returned from PT. For those of you who are not familiar with PT it is a workout sessions for the troops which usually takes place early in the morning. Apparently, while they were working out, they were informed about the first plane that hit the twin towers aka World Trade Center.

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I remember walking into the front room and asking why he was home so early. He told me to come over to the sofa and then filled me in on the events that had just taken place. We were stationed at The National Training Center in California known as NTC. At the beginning of the attack we really didn’t know the full account of what was going on. As we gazed at the TV we would see the following planes being rocketed into buildings and mass chaos follow.

After that day, a few weeks later, my husband and most of the troops on our street started receiving special orders. Some of us were sent to Guam, Japan, while others like my husband were sent to Germany. It was a scary time. In the coming weeks, I remember a flood of feelings rushing over us. After we arrived in Germany my husband and others like him were rushed off to training. After their training was completed they would return to make sure their wills and POAs were in order.

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While my husband was fighting in Iraq my mother got sick and died. This was the first time I would take a flight post 9/11 by myself. I hardly remember anything about the flight home, but I remember the flight that reunited me with my husband almost a year later.

We were seated next to a group of Middle Eastern men on the flight to Frankfurt. I remember vividly as I secretly wanted to exit as soon as they made their way in my direction. Something wouldn’t let me go. Instead of getting off the flight I engaged the man beside me in conversation. I told myself this would prevent them from wanting to take the plane down if they saw me as a good American.

After 8 hours the flight ended and a sudden wave of shame washed over me. I allowed my arrogance to think that I could speak for an entire people, and I allowed my prejudice to dictate my actions. I had never considered myself prejudice until looking back at that moment. Sure, I spoke kind words, but the thoughts behind the words wasn’t something I was proud of.

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You see, sometimes we can be prejudice and not even realize it because it is so deeply embedded in who we are at that moment. We trick ourselves into thinking that we are doing some service to a cause when in truth, we are doing it for other reasons. 9/11 means a lot of things to many different people, but this year please remember the healing stage known as recovery.

Love one another and let the differences between you be something good and not bad. That’s all I have.

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Goodnight.

Sorry if this is gritty!!

Added Benefits Of Remote Learning that some of us never considered.

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My husband and I have a rule when it comes to explaining coursework to our children. The general rule of thumb is that I help with anything that isn’t math-related! When I was in college, I took math classes that would pretty much ensure the completion of my degrees, and when it came to math, I would take the lesser of the evils.

My husband explaining a problem to our daughter.

He, on the other hand, would take high-level math courses, but I put him to shame with my many science classes. So, here we are explaining the academics that we learned in college to our children to help them build better understandings of their coursework.

I guess it might be considered the uncovered gem in remote learning. While the teachers do a great job preparing and sending the information for the children, it doesn’t necessarily come with the same level of understanding that they would get in a classroom. So, at the end of the day, we find ourselves having to explain new vocabulary and other questions.

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We also get those random questions that stink of information that belongs in unread paragraphs, and when we come across those, we simply inform our children to go back to their initial readings!!! Helping is one thing, but doing their work is not an option!

How DID Trump’s Mishandling Of COVID-19 Information Shape Current Numbers?

COVID-19 officially hit cruises like The Diamond Princess around the early part of the year. These cruises would carry people across various parts of the world with newly infected people walking the virus to their home shores. News has surfaced from a recent video with President Trump talking about the severity of the virus.

What we now know:

Trump knew the 7th of February that the COVID-19 disease was airborne.

He also knew how dangerous the virus was and that the virus was killing both young people.

With this information going public, we now have to look back at what happened around that time regarding the outbreak. At the end of January Trump placed a ban on people coming from China due to the virus. This informs us that he knew something before February. The bans on other nations being hit by COVID-19 did not take place until after the beginning of March.

https://www.defense.gov/Explore/Spotlight/Coronavirus/DOD-Response-Timeline/

The beginning response to COVID-19 looked pretty textbook at the end of January. It would appear that everything was being implemented to prevent the spread behind the scenes. However, the problems start in February due to implementing things that should have taken place early that month. It took Trump over a month for his travel ban regarding China to include other parts of the world.

By this time, you still had cruises in the water and people walking around not having accurate information about the virus. As he was declaring COVID-19 a national emergency in the second week of March, he was coming off a rally downplaying the severity of the virus, by saying it was a hoax.

Perhaps it was moments like these that helped create the largest gap in understanding what the virus could do, and how the virus could upset life. Off and on, Trump would publicly struggle to define COVID-19 as the monster he privately referred to it as being in the infamous interview. In many cases, those missed chances to declare the virus as the true danger to the American public presented the American people a false sense of safety. It would be the deciding factor in how many American families would choose to protect themselves, or not protect themselves from COVID-19.

At the end of the day, Trump defended his decision by summing it as a means of trying to prevent panic. Yet, every day he tries to push panic in our homes and lives by turning us against each other. Yet the spin continues.

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2020-11-03T10:11:00

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Remote Learning For Parents

So, the girls and I have officially started remote learning this year. I like to include myself in the equation because we are in it together. As the year is just beginning, I am quickly learning my place. My children have even asked if I would allow them to return to school. I am like the Hulk, at least that is what they told my husband.

I will admit, I had a little freak out session when one of my daughters picked up her cell phone and proceeded to call her friend, who was also a remote learner. I just logged on the T Mobile site and politely informed her that I was about to turn her phone off.

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After her outrage wore off, she was able to once again focus on her work. I learned a valuable lesson towards the end of last year. I learned to stay in the room with the girls as they completed their assignments. I turned a gaming room into their classroom. While they are working on their assignments, I can be working on my articles or something else.

I hope you guys are finding the right fit for your remote learning experience.

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